Hey everyone! It’s been waaaaaaay too long, I do apologise. 
So let me tell you about what’s been happening with Trestle these past weeks. Most importantly, we were invited to show the game at GDC, via the amazing IndieMEGABOOTH. I couldn’t make it to fly out there, but my Sets cohort Andrew was holding down the fort in my absence. it actually worked out nicely in that he could deliver feedback from players on the show floor to me while I could keep working on the game and send him a new build immediately. We ended up with a crazy double-time hyper build that ramps the difficulty up to insane levels, it was quite fun :)
Shortly after GDC, I went to Berlin to attend AmazeFest, which turned out to be lovely. It felt like an art gallery more than a game expo to me, I fucking loved it. At nights the whole place turned into a party— Chipzel and others played some banging sets. At Amaze there were a couple of open screens where anyone could show off their projects, so I put on Trestle one day and watched people play it. Having missed out on the experience at GDC I was eager to make up for it. And it was a blast, but more importantly it was valuable.
Which brings us to what’s really going on.
Trestle wasn’t good enough. 
Gathering feedback from both players and devs at 2 different events made me realise that while there was the base of something great, potential, promise- whatever you want to call it- the game just wasn’t where it needed to be. So for the past month or so, I’ve been systematically breaking everything down and rebuilding it to create a tighter experience. While I was doing that, I decided to address something that has been nagging me: Trestle was made in a “web game” resolution so taking it to fullscreen meant there was some empty space at the edges, it wasn’t widescreen. I really wanted to up the level of immersion so I redesigned some elements to make that happen. and while I was doing that, I chose to basically redo all of the art. And I’m extremely happy with how it’s coming together now, from the tighter arcade experience to the lush, 16 bit-ish new art style. 
Over the coming weeks I’ll go more in-depth about how the mechanics have changed (don’t worry, the core gameplay and mechanics are all the same, just… well, better) and how the new art direction plays into that. 

Hey everyone! It’s been waaaaaaay too long, I do apologise. 

So let me tell you about what’s been happening with Trestle these past weeks. Most importantly, we were invited to show the game at GDC, via the amazing IndieMEGABOOTH. I couldn’t make it to fly out there, but my Sets cohort Andrew was holding down the fort in my absence. it actually worked out nicely in that he could deliver feedback from players on the show floor to me while I could keep working on the game and send him a new build immediately. We ended up with a crazy double-time hyper build that ramps the difficulty up to insane levels, it was quite fun :)

Shortly after GDC, I went to Berlin to attend AmazeFest, which turned out to be lovely. It felt like an art gallery more than a game expo to me, I fucking loved it. At nights the whole place turned into a party— Chipzel and others played some banging sets. At Amaze there were a couple of open screens where anyone could show off their projects, so I put on Trestle one day and watched people play it. Having missed out on the experience at GDC I was eager to make up for it. And it was a blast, but more importantly it was valuable.

Which brings us to what’s really going on.

Trestle wasn’t good enough. 

Gathering feedback from both players and devs at 2 different events made me realise that while there was the base of something great, potential, promise- whatever you want to call it- the game just wasn’t where it needed to be. So for the past month or so, I’ve been systematically breaking everything down and rebuilding it to create a tighter experience. While I was doing that, I decided to address something that has been nagging me: Trestle was made in a “web game” resolution so taking it to fullscreen meant there was some empty space at the edges, it wasn’t widescreen. I really wanted to up the level of immersion so I redesigned some elements to make that happen. and while I was doing that, I chose to basically redo all of the art. And I’m extremely happy with how it’s coming together now, from the tighter arcade experience to the lush, 16 bit-ish new art style. 

Over the coming weeks I’ll go more in-depth about how the mechanics have changed (don’t worry, the core gameplay and mechanics are all the same, just… well, better) and how the new art direction plays into that. 

I’m going to share a short story, bear with me!
Rewind to November 2013.
So, pictured above: That’s the original Trestle mockup. I asked myself “what can I do with a grid-based action game, and can I cram it into a Game Boy style?”
After prototyping the concept the answers turned out to be “I can do a lot with a grid-based action game, and the Game Boy style doesn’t do it justice.”
From there, trestle turned into a flash game I meant to finish before the end of ‘13. At some point- I think I did it just for fun- I threw the prototype on an iPhone/ iPad and it ended up being really fun. At the same time, I found that I could keep exploring the base mechanic of the prototype deeper and deeper.
This was turning into more than a flash game. 
Fast-forward to right freaking now.
Trestle has become Sets and Settings’ main project. It will be our first commercial multi-platform title. There have been articles, fan art, and of course the Indie MEGABOOTH reached out to us to get the game exposed at GDC. It’s been an amazing ride so far and we’ve still got our foot on the gas, never letting up.

With the attention, we’ve also started seeing more negative responses, largely from people who seem upset or concerned about the MMBN connection. So I wanted to take a moment to say this, and I’m going to make it look all fancy because it’s important:
Trestle started as a mash-up of Super Crate Box and MMBN but that’s not where it ends.
Every day, I work on this project. I bust my ass making Trestle. I would feel like a complete bastard if I was putting all this effort into a rip-off or clone or whatever. With every new feature, with every new build, Trestle removes itself a little further from its starting point.
It is very much its own game.
There’s a whole bunch of stuff I’m not revealing until GDC, so for now these words remain just words, but I want to be clear on this: We are aware and grateful to have the voice that we do, and we want to use it in a positive way.
Thanks,
Folmer 

I’m going to share a short story, bear with me!

Rewind to November 2013.

So, pictured above: That’s the original Trestle mockup. I asked myself “what can I do with a grid-based action game, and can I cram it into a Game Boy style?”

After prototyping the concept the answers turned out to be “I can do a lot with a grid-based action game, and the Game Boy style doesn’t do it justice.”

From there, trestle turned into a flash game I meant to finish before the end of ‘13. At some point- I think I did it just for fun- I threw the prototype on an iPhone/ iPad and it ended up being really fun. At the same time, I found that I could keep exploring the base mechanic of the prototype deeper and deeper.

This was turning into more than a flash game. 

Fast-forward to right freaking now.

Trestle has become Sets and Settings’ main project. It will be our first commercial multi-platform title. There have been articles, fan art, and of course the Indie MEGABOOTH reached out to us to get the game exposed at GDC. It’s been an amazing ride so far and we’ve still got our foot on the gas, never letting up.

With the attention, we’ve also started seeing more negative responses, largely from people who seem upset or concerned about the MMBN connection. So I wanted to take a moment to say this, and I’m going to make it look all fancy because it’s important:

Trestle started as a mash-up of Super Crate Box and MMBN but that’s not where it ends.

Every day, I work on this project. I bust my ass making Trestle. I would feel like a complete bastard if I was putting all this effort into a rip-off or clone or whatever. With every new feature, with every new build, Trestle removes itself a little further from its starting point.

It is very much its own game.

There’s a whole bunch of stuff I’m not revealing until GDC, so for now these words remain just words, but I want to be clear on this: We are aware and grateful to have the voice that we do, and we want to use it in a positive way.

Thanks,

Folmer 

Because of the MEGABOOTH announcement I figured I had to drop something special for #screenshotsaturday, so here’s a first look at a couple of new features I’ve been working on:

  • Drones that’ll fight alongside the player (think familiars in Binding of Isaac or, well, drones in Risk of Rain)
  • Secondary, stackable upgrades. In the top image I was rocking two missiles, they drop at regular intervals.  

Very happy with the way the game is coming together now, and I’ve got some really big announcements coming up so stay tuned :)